Friday, February 2, 2007

The Screwtape Letters

I didn't plan on blogging today but this news was too good to wait until after the weekend...they're making C.S. Lewis'The Screwtape Letters into a movie!

Lewis is the prolific writer behind The Chronicles of Narnia and is one of the most celebrated writers in Christian history. Ralph Winter, the producer of X-Men, is heading this project alongside Walden Media (Narnia). Just in case you didn't know, Winter is a professing Christian, so yay for that!

Jeffrey at Looking Closer Journal asked people to post our wish-lists for the film so here's my dream team:

Screenwriters: Charlie Kaufman (Adaptation, Eternal Sunshine for the Spotless Mind) and Zach Braff (Garden State)

Director: Michel Gondry (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, The Science of Sleep)

Actor: Zach Braff as "Wormwood"
It's gonna take some amazingly creative minds to pull off The Screwtape Letters as a movie, so if these people don't do it, things could go terribly wrong and that would be a shame, because who wants another another book adaptation gone bad.

Think otherwise? Who would you chose to write, direct and star in the movie?

You can read the full scoop at Variety.com.

And yes, that is a picture of Zach Braff's head on the bookcover. I'm just silly like that.

3 comments:

Joy Kennelly said...

I love your choices! I actually interviewed Charlie Kaufman for Adaptation and he's brilliant.

Thanks for the update and the fun ideas. I hope they read your blog and follow your suggestions!

C.S. Lewis is amazing and this film, if done right, will be amazing too!

SolShine7 said...

Joy, you interviewed Charlie Kaufman--that's so cool!! I'd really enjoy being able to sit down and pick his brain, he's one of the most creative screenwriters out there.

You should write a blog about it.

And I hope by some "divine intervention" that they follow my suggestions too. One can always hope.

Angela/SciFiChick said...

It makes me nervous that they're making this into a movie. I really hope it's not secularized too much, and that they stay true to the book's meaning.